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Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Study

Matt: If cards don't work, do you know it is because the cards don't work or because the facilitation doesn't work?

2 years ago

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Study

Rapp & Matt: don’t know if should rush the design if you don’t know what the theory about how the cards might affect learning

2 years ago

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Study

Rapp: look in literature for how people use the cards that are already designed to inform your own designs

2 years ago

1 person agrees
Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Study

Matt: Look at process or product at different levels of learning for facilitator or kids as a result of design of cards

2 years ago

Kelly D'Angelo — Simplified Argument Critique: Solution

You give the example that IDEO gave their cards to designers. Presumably, they have much more prior knowledge... or... fewer misconceptions... than 9-12 students. Thinking of some novice-expert ideas from the reading. How do you see this affecting your solution? If at all?

2 years ago

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Study

Could you do a before/after of seeing how teachers' behaviors change before and after using the cards? Is that question interesting to you?

2 years ago

Sarah White - Or you want to see how kids' learning changes as a result of being in environments where there are cards versus where there are not cards
-I think this was more apparent from your research study design

2 years ago

Sarah Gates — General

Yes, it seems like your experimental outcomes are focused on the learners. The experiment should support the practical argument, unless you're using student learning success as a measure of effective teaching/better teacher training.

2 years ago

Spencer Carlson — General

If you're interested in the teacher learning, then you will want to design a study that collects evidence that could show that they learned from using the cards. I think currently your study looks more at student learning.

2 years ago

Spencer Carlson - (based on your response that you wanted to focus on the teacher)

2 years ago

1 person agrees

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Task

Matt: what is it that you want the teacher to learn?

2 years ago

Sarah White - David's response: want teachers to know all the things that students could learn from a challenge and be able to teach these things

2 years ago

Kelly D'Angelo — General

Addendum- it is not always that easy, I know. But, sounds like kids are coming away with superficial knowledge. So, in this case, need to change the way we approach the teaching methods and facilitation to deepen learning experience

2 years ago

Kelly D'Angelo — Simplified Argument Critique: Audience

I think this is a clear cut teacher problem. Maybe I am missing something. If our kids aren't learning what you want them to learn, then don't teachers need to change their approach to instruction?

2 years ago

David Rapp — General

Do you already know what is effective in the maker spacers for facilitators? Is there some account for what makes a facilitator or facilitator practices effective? If so, that could be linked to the design of the cards. It also might be a step before conducting the experiment. Experiments are costly in terms of time and resources.

2 years ago

1 person agrees
Trey Smith — Simplified Argument Critique: Research question

I'm wondering a little more about what you mean by "deeper learning." I think you may have provided some examples, but I think I'd benefit from a description of what you mean here. In your description of mistakes you provide one example: "by asking conceptual questions during the making process." Are there are examples?

If you've provided these elsewhere or defined deeper learning and I missed it, then I apologize!

2 years ago

Spencer Carlson — General

So your study is about evaluating the use of the cards?

Just a thought: An interesting argument you might make (would obviously need evidence) is that cards could self-fade because they're a little inconvenient to sort through, so facilitators will rely on them a lot up front but then as they internalize the strategies they would use them less.

2 years ago

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Study

Why fixed intervals and not using them as needed?

2 years ago

Kelly D'Angelo — Simplified Argument Critique: Solution

What is a FUSE studio?

2 years ago

Allena Berry - It's a Maker Space lab.

2 years ago

1 person agrees

David Rapp — General

How are the cards that are given to designers different in terms of development and application than the cards might be that are given to facilitators? Are there differences in the planning and use for the different groups? This might constrain the kinds of applications you derive for the children from knowing about the designers.

2 years ago

Allena Berry — General

It seems like your rationale for the cards is based on some learning science theories (like metacognition and connection), but I think you need to be prepared to justify why cards would be the best intervention.

2 years ago

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Solution

These question cards remind me of Piaget's interview questions. Why might these cards be effective in terms of principles of constructivism?

2 years ago

Tyler Lindow — Simplified Argument Critique: Solution

Have the IDEO or DSD cards been researched for their effectiveness?

2 years ago

David Rapp — General

Is there any evidence for the use of these cards with designers? Does it help? Any evidence-based analogs to make that would justify giving these cards to the facilitators?

2 years ago

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Solution

Interesting that your solution isn't just a training but rather a different type of intervention. Can you justify why you chose this?

2 years ago

1 person agrees
Sarah Gates — General

Good job on step 3, why learners make mistakes and why they cannot correct them are very clear :) #nice

2 years ago

Kelly D'Angelo — Simplified Argument Critique: Mistakes

I am surprised to hear that DBL or PBL(2) is not much more fruitful than instruction-based.
It sounds like the problem is that they are learning superficial processes only. I wonder how "classic" trades of car repair, plumbing, electrician, etc. are taught

2 years ago

David Rapp — General

I see the struggle - you are focusing sometimes on the students/children who are working in the maker spaces, and sometimes on the facilitators #warning

2 years ago

Sarah White — Simplified Argument Critique: Audience

You used the word "they" and I didn't know whether you were referring to facilitators or students #lookout

2 years ago

Spencer Carlson — General

Mistakes are clear - but seems you're switching to talk about the mistakes students in maker spaces make (not the mistakes facilitators make - I thought facilitators were the learner?)#warning

2 years ago

1 person agrees

Spencer Carlson - If you care about facilitators and want to focus on them, then you should figure out what mistakes THEY make that lead to students' shallow learning in maker spaces.

2 years ago

Christopher Leatherwood — General

Not learning that much or not learning that much more?

2 years ago

Trey Smith — General

Really appreciate the specificity of the 3 jobs that facilitators have and pointing out your interest in the third: deepening learning during making.

2 years ago

Allena Berry — General

Overall, you are giving nice background. #nice

2 years ago

Allena Berry - See Trey's point above; that is the background to which I am referring.

2 years ago

1 person agrees

Christopher Leatherwood — General

Thank you for the overview before focusing on what you want to do.

2 years ago

Spencer Carlson — General

learner = facilitators of maker spaces. (sometimes undergrads, sometimes professional makers, sometimes a librarian, etc)
teacher = unclear - often, no teacher (?)
stakeholder = White House and other people who care about maker faires/people who want children to get involved in STEM
researcher = STEM education researchers interested in making/maker spaces

2 years ago

Spencer Carlson - #nice - and given it seems there's no consistent teacher, you might call that out specifically as an interesting challenge that we should care about addressing (alongside the diverse backgrounds of facilitators)

2 years ago

1 person agrees

Allena Berry — General

I think you do a nice job of talking about the problem that facilitators face (in that they come from disparate backgrounds) #good

2 years ago

David Rapp — General

Making facilitators - what do they do, are they effective, etc. Good question #nice

2 years ago

1 person agrees

Sarah White - Can elaborate on this in two directions: why this question is important for the research literature and why this question is important for achieving goals of maker spaces

2 years ago

Sarah White - #watchout the way you framed the beginning part made us think you were focusing on facilitators as the learners and then you transitioned to the learners being the participants in makerspaces

2 years ago

David Rapp — General

Justifications for maker spaces sounds like the benefits of...wait for it...drumroll.....CONSTRUCTIVISM. #yay

2 years ago

1 person agrees
Christopher Leatherwood — General

Definition#nice great for me who was not sure what exactly that meant?

2 years ago

Trey Smith — Simplified Argument Critique: Audience

Thanks for the quick intro to making and for being clear about your interest in the facilitators of maker spaces as the learners.

2 years ago

1 person agrees

Sarah White - Still waiting to hear a clear articulation of the problem but you're making the case that there is an important space

2 years ago

Sarah White — General

David: wants feedback on who the learner is and where the intervention should be

2 years ago

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