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Notre Dame

HCW reduce food waste on campus?

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Kiely Wilcox joined the project

3 years ago ·

PJ Endler

3 years ago ·

PJ Endler

3 years ago ·

PJ Endler

3 years ago ·

PJ Endler

Team CleaND Update:

Our group briefly met today to go over steps moving forward for our project. From our prototyping session, we learned that one flaw in our design was that people simply did not notice the new signs we put up. We will have to really make them stand out compared to the current food signs.

In the coming week, a member of our group is going to meet with the dining hall nutritionist to discuss what nutrition information could realistically be put on the new food labels. From there, we have to decide what information would actually be relevant to people and what information would be better left off the sign.

We recognize that implementation of our idea may be a challenge because of the amount of work it could potentially be, and usually is, for the dining hall to completely renovate all of their food labels. That being said, we are focusing on making their job easier, possibly through a computer code that will import data from a spreadsheet and automatically paste it onto a food label template.

3 years ago ·

Clara Hesler

Team Club SaNDwich Update 2:
Over the past two weeks, the team worked on prototyping and subsequently testing its design. We spent time brainstorming visual representations of our “How Can We” statement, trying to come up with something that would encourage people to recognize their own hunger in order to minimize their waste. We came up with a few ideas that were similar enough to combine for testing, including bowls cut in half and marked at the place to which it should be filled for small/medium/large portions; plates with pie charts on them to indicate how much of the plate should be filled to make up a portion; and flyers that informed students about the most wasted foods in the dining hall, fruits and vegetables, dictating how many of that item should make up a portion.

When we tested our designs, we noticed that students did not pay much attention to them. We deduced that students did not feel compelled to look at our visuals because they were in inconvenient locations, required students to stop and read rather than move quickly through the lines, and did not ultimately give enough information to induce a change in student habits. Some students did stop to look at the signs that informed them of which foods were most frequently wasted, and the team hopes to include that in its improved design.

The team’s next goal is to incorporate the failings of its first design, which became evident in testing, into its new model. In brainstorming, we determined that using more information about food waste in general would be more beneficial than showing students portion sizes and trying to change their eating habits as they are doling out their own food. The team guesses that it would be easier to use the question “How Hungry Are You?”, which we used on some of our flyers, and go on to explain the amount of waste that results in getting too much food. In doing this, the focus becomes less pushy than specific revisions of how much food students should take, especially considering that portion sizes are variable depending on the person and their eating habits.

Moving forward, the team hopes to go into more detail in its new design and to eventually test that. Though we were a little disappointed in our first test, it showed us which pieces of our design were flawed and which should be strengthened. Ultimately, the testing was an educational experience.

3 years ago ·

Clara Hesler

3 years ago ·

Clara Hesler

3 years ago ·

Clara Hesler

Team Club SaNDwich Update 1:
Early in the week, the team came up with two broad “How Can We” categories: 1)How can we make people more aware of nutritional information? and 2)How can we encourage people to personally reduce food waste? We knew we would have to synthesize these veins of thought, because they weren’t specific enough to solidify our mission. We eventually decided to move forward using “How can we use visual cues to encourage people to consider how much food they will really eat?”

The team noted that most people we researched said they ended up with leftover food on their plate because they were unsure of how hungry they were and of how much food would satisfy their hunger. We decided that showing people things like nutritional information and serving sizes, using simplified visual representations, could get them to serve themselves portions that would lead them to waste less food. Though we didn’t include personal reduction of food waste in our new question, it underlies our thinking during the project in general. For example, when we incorporate the visual cues into the dining hall, we may accompany it with reminders that eating what you put on your plate leads to less food waste.

Over the next week, we intend to create a prototype of the visual cues we want to incorporate into the dining hall. We may run into difficulty making visual representations for all of the many foods served in the dining hall, especially given that it varies day to day; we may disagree over the ideal location to place visual clues; and we may find it hard to motivate people to serve portions more hunger-accurate portions given the limited amount of time people spend at each food station. In designing our prototype, we will have to consider these problems more, deciding, where to place the visuals, what to include in the visuals, and how to get people to pay attention to them.

This week, we went from knowing what our problem was to coming up with a potential and specific way to solve it. Though it was rough to start the week with indecision about our “How Can We” question, it was rewarding to end the week with a clear plan of how to move forward.

3 years ago ·

Emily Klimt joined the project

3 years ago ·

PJ Endler

3 years ago ·

PJ Endler

Here's an update from the waste-reducing signage group. This week, we examined our HCW statement: "How can we make effective signage that fosters conscious waste reducing habits?" We realized that our long term goal was to get critical information in the hands of students at the right time so that these habits would develop on their own. This meant creating signage that was dynamic, that students would continue to notice for more than just a few days after they were put up.

We thought different messages or images printed directly on the tray would be a dynamic and effective way to promote individual change. This idea will be expanded upon in the next week.

We decided that for our main design, in order to remain daring, feasible, and applicable, should be a total reform of the food-specific signs usually directly above the food. We would make bigger, more noticeable signs, with the following critical information: approximate serving size, calorie count, allergen information, and good food pairings (grilled cheese & tomato soup, etc.). We would also incorporate some non-critical information into the sign to keep people looking at them, such as a food-wasting fact, pun, joke, fun fact, Tim McCarthy, ND memes. Since the only purpose of the non-critical information is to have a better chance of people noticing the critical information, it would have to be a well-designed accent to the label as a whole.

3 years ago ·

John Nolan

Here's an update on our group's progress so far, the ND Food Yak team. We went into this week with a few HCW statements. We asked how can we mitigate social pressures in the dining hall, help students better plan their meals, or give students a better visualization of portion sizes. Social pressures have a more pernicious effect than we initially expected since students generally go to meals with a regular group of friends, even if they are not hungry, and leave at the same time, even if they have not finished. The other two HCW statements target students who either get to much food or try food that they do not like and regularly throw out left overs.

We considered a snack table for students that want to eat with their friends but do not expect to finish a full meal. This concept also went along with to go containers that could hold snacks or left overs. We did not receive much negative feedback for this idea but it seemed like the most difficult to organize with NDFS. We also presented a color scheme, and other visual aids to help students plan their meals. Again, we did not receive to much negative feedback, but another group was targeting portion sizes. Also, our systems might become a bit complicated or tedious for hurried students. We received a lot of positive feedback for the food Yik-Yak idea, an app that would let students up or down vote the current menu items. We even considered displaying the trending items on a screen in the antechamber of the dining hall. This voting system would help students plan their meals by picking out their favorite food from the trending items.

We decided to prototype this idea with a whiteboard that we monitor in north dining hall. We would partition the board to represent each menu item then let students up or down vote each item with a red or green sticky note. We would periodically collect these sticky notes and tally them for each food item box. We hope to set up this prototype for Thursday lunch and Friday dinner.

3 years ago ·

John Nolan

3 years ago ·

Clara Hesler

Team Club SaNDwich Update 1:
Early in the week, the team came up with two broad “How Can We” categories: 1)How can we make people more aware of nutritional information? and 2)How can we encourage people to personally reduce food waste? We knew we would have to synthesize these veins of thought, because they weren’t specific enough to solidify our mission. We eventually decided to move forward using “How can we use visual cues to encourage people to consider how much food they will really eat?”

The team noted that most people we researched said they ended up with leftover food on their plate because they were unsure of how hungry they were and of how much food would satisfy their hunger. We decided that showing people things like nutritional information and serving sizes, using simplified visual representations, could get them to serve themselves portions that would lead them to waste less food. Though we didn’t include personal reduction of food waste in our new question, it underlies our thinking during the project in general. For example, when we incorporate the visual cues into the dining hall, we may accompany it with reminders that eating what you put on your plate leads to less food waste.

Over the next week, we intend to create a prototype of the visual cues we want to incorporate into the dining hall. We may run into difficulty making visual representations for all of the many foods served in the dining hall, especially given that it varies day to day; we may disagree over the ideal location to place visual clues; and we may find it hard to motivate people to serve portions more hunger-accurate portions given the limited amount of time people spend at each food station. In designing our prototype, we will have to consider these problems more, deciding, where to place the visuals, what to include in the visuals, and how to get people to pay attention to them.

This week, we went from knowing what our problem was to coming up with a potential and specific way to solve it. Though it was rough to start the week with indecision about our “How Can We” question, it was rewarding to end the week with a clear plan of how to move forward.

3 years ago ·

Clara Hesler joined the project

3 years ago ·

Robert Calvey

Hey y'all. Sorry these weren't visible on the bottom of the feed anymore:

1) What did we accomplish in the last week?
2) What will we accomplish in the next week?
3) What obstacles are impeding us from accomplishing our tasks?
4) What are the big decisions we are making right now?
5) What was a high point and a low point of the week?

3 years ago ·

Robert Calvey

3 years ago ·

Robert Calvey

1) What did we accomplish in the last week?
2) What will we accomplish in the next week?
3) What obstacles are impeding us from accomplishing our tasks?
4) What are the big decisions we are making right now?
5) What was a high point and a low point of the week?

3 years ago ·

Robert Calvey

3 years ago ·

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